Long Lines For Free School Meals, Thanks to The Economy

The number of students receiving free or reduced-price school lunches rose to 21 million last school year, up from 18 million in 2006-07. That number represents a 17 percent increase, according to an analysis by The New York Times of data from the Department of Agriculture, which administers the meals program. Eleven states, including Florida, Nevada, New Jersey and Tennessee, had four-year increases of 25 percent or more. This represents huge shifts in a vast program that has long been characterized by incremental growth.

Students in families with incomes up to 130 percent of the poverty level — or $29,055 for a family of four — are eligible for free school meals. Children in a four-member household with income up to $41,348 qualify for a subsidized lunch priced at 40 cents.

All 50 states have shown increases, according to Agriculture Department data. In Florida, which has 2.6 million public school students, an additional 265,000 students have become eligible for subsidies since 2007, with increases in virtually every district.

Click the “analysis” link above, or here, to read more of the Times story. For general information on the National School Lunch Program, click here.

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About endchildhungerblog

End Childhood Hunger/End Child Hunger advocates for greater access to existing federal programs such as school breakfast, school lunch, after-school snacks, after-school dinners, summer meals, and more nutrition education. We utilize social media for advocacy and to support public and private like-minded organizations, educate, promote awareness, fight for change and for an end to childhood hunger.
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